Schedule for ToP Group Meetings:
PY 695-001: Tuesday, 9:00 am- 10:50 am (351 GP)
PY 695-002: Thursday, 1:00 pm- 2:50 pm (351 GP)

Assignments are listed below. However, I may ask you to do additional assignments during the semester. Should changes become necessary, I’ll notify you by email or at our weekly group meetings.

 

December 2014:

Course preparation

Bernstein, D. A. (1997). Reflections on teaching introductory psychology. In R. J. Sternberg (Ed.), Teaching introductory psychology: Survival tips from the experts (pp. 35-47). Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Polick A. S., Cullen, K. L. & Buskist, W. (2010, September). How teaching makes a difference in students' lives. APS Observer, 23, 31-33.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass. (Note that this book is available in the Teaching Resource Room adjacent to my office. It may be checked out overnight.)

(pp. 3-20): Designing or revising a course
(pp. 21-36): The comprehensive course syllabus
(pp. 491-496) Holding office hours
(pp. 497-503): E-mail, text messages, and instant messages
(pp. 37-47): First days of class
(pp. 278-289): Motivating students

Sana, F. Weston, T., & Cepeda, N. J. (2013). Laptop multitasking hinders classroom learning for both users and nearby peers. Computers & Education, 62, 24-31.


Resources for creating your course and constructing your syllabus

UA guidelines for syllabus construction. Required and suggested elements of course syllabi.

Blackboard tutorials. Instructions for setting up and using the University's online course support software.

Sample PY 101 course contract. One way to ensure that students read the syllabus and understand the course requirements is to have them submit a signed course contract. Here's an example.

Guidelines for critical thinking in psychology. Many instructors emphasize the development of critical thinking skills in their teaching. Carol Wade developed this set of guidelines for students.

Plagiarism tutorial for students.The University of Southern Mississippi's online tutorial. Students may print a certificate of completion. 

 


Dec 31: Assignment: Send a draft of your syllabus to me as an e-mail attachment. Team teachers: Send a draft agreement of responsibilities.


Jan 5: Final details (9:00am-11:00am; 351 GP)

Assignment: Be prepared to (a) identify themes in the course preparation articles that affected how you are approaching your PY 101 course, (b) discuss plans for your first PY 101 class meeting, and (c) identify points in the Buskist and Prentice-Dunn articles that are noteworthy to you.

Buskist, W. (2013). Preparing the new psychology professoriate to teach: Past, present, and future. Teaching of Psychology, 40, 333-339.

Prentice-Dunn, S. (2006). Supervision of new instructors: Promoting a rewarding first experience in teaching. Teaching of Psychology, 33, 45-47.


Jan 6: Lectures (9:00am-11:00am; 351 GP)

Assignment: Be prepared to offer answers to the following questions: How do you decide what to present when covering a particular chapter? What tips did you pick up about creating a lecture? What are some techniques for beginning a class? What advice about delivering a lecture did you find helpful? What are some problems associated with using “weak language?”

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

(pp. 135-147): Preparing to teach the large-enrollment course
(pp. 148-156): Delivering a lecture
(pp. 157-161): Explaining clearly
(pp. 162-167): Personalizing the large-enrollment course
(pp. 259-272): Helping students learn
(pp. 48-51 only): Classroom conduct and decorum

Middendorf, J., & Yandell, S. (2002). Replacing weak language with strong: Transforming your teaching persona. National Teaching and Learning Forum, 11, 7-9.

Weir, R. (2012, March 21). YouTube to the rescue. Inside Higher Education. Retrieved November 28, 2012 from http://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2012/03/21/essay-how-use-youtube-teaching-tool.


Jan 7:
First day of your PY 101 course. Deadline for posting PY 101 syllabus on the Office of Institutional Research & Assessment's (OIRA) site.


Jan 13 (PY 695 section 001) or Jan 15 (PY 695 section 002): Discussions and groups

Note: Beginning this week, PY 695 section 001 and PY 695 section 002 will meet separately.

Assignment
: Be prepared to discuss: What is active learning? Why should we use active learning techniques in the classroom? What helpful advice did you get about asking questions and conducting discussions? How can you make use of King's critical thinking questions? Provide examples of how think-pair-share, minute papers, and small groups can be used in your teaching.

“Don’t tell students what you can show them, and don’t show them when they can do it themselves”. (Barbara Davis)

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

(pp. 97-105): Leading a discussion
(pp. 106-111): Encouraging student participation in a discussion
(pp. 112-117): Online discussions
(pp. 118-126): Asking questions
(pp. 127-132): Fielding student questions
(pp. 207-213): Informal groups
(pp. 222-228): Case studies
(pp. 290-297): Informally assessing students' learning

Yoder, J. D., & Hochevar, C. M. (2005). Encouraging active learning can improve students' test performance on examinations. Teaching of Psychology, 32, 91-95.

Richmond, A. S., & Hagan, L. K. (2011). Promoting higher level thinking in psychology: Is active learning the answer? Teaching of Psychology, 38, 102-105.

King, A. (1995). Critical thinking question stems.

King, A. (1993). Think-pair-share.

Informal writing activities. Written in class, may be shared.

Team-based learning: Group work that works. A 12-min video from the University of Texas that explains the fundamentals.

 

Jan 20 (section 001) or Jan 22 (section 002): Tests and grades

Assignment: By 8:00 am on the day of your group meeting, submit one question for discussion that is based on the readings.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

(pp. 362-374): Quizzes, tests, and exams
(pp. 375-389): Allaying students' anxieties about tests
(pp. 390-400): Multiple-choice and matching tests
(pp. 401-408): Short-answer and essay tests
(pp. 409-418): Grading practices

McBurney, D. H. (1999). Cheating: Preventing and dealing with academic dishonesty. In B. Perlman, L. I. McCann, & S. H. McFadden (Eds.) (1999). Lessons learned: Practical advice for the teaching of psychology (pp. 213-217). Washington, DC: American Psychological Society.

Gurung, R. A. R., & McCann, L. I. (2011, April). How should students study? Tips, advice, and pitfalls. APS Observer, 24. Retrieved may 3, 2011 from http://www.psychologicalscience.org/index.php/publications/observer/2011/april-11/how-should-students-study-tips-advice-and-pitfalls.html

Jan 26-Feb 4: Assignment: Peer observations

1. Attend two classes, each one taught by a different colleague.
2. Write a 1-2 page summary of your observations.
3. Send (via e-mail attachment) copies to the instructor and me.


Jan 27 (section 001) or Jan 29 (section 002): Consultation information

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

(pp. 472-480): Video recordings and classroom observations


Jan 30-Feb 10:
Assignment: Consultation preparation

1. Record your class using the department's video camera.
2. Review your video. Optional: You may want to use the checklist on pp. 473-477 of the Davis textbook to guide your viewing.
3. Administer the 24-item evaluation form to your class. Take response sheets to Testing Services (205 Student Services) for scoring.
4. Pick up the summary printout from Testing Services.
5. Administer a narrative evaluation form to your class.
6. Review the numerical and narrative evaluations from your PY 101 class. For the 24-item form, there are three primary dimensions.
7. Send me (via e-mail attachment) a summary of the themes in the student evaluations and your reaction to the video.
8. Give the video and evaluations to me. If possible, email any handouts or PowerPoint slides used in class on the day of the video. Schedule consultation appointment.


Feb 3 (section 001) or Feb 5 (section 002): Student writing and critical thinking

Assignment: Be prepared to identify suggestions that you think are valuable in each of the following areas: Creating written assignments, scoring written assignments, and preventing plagiarism. In addition, identify a "take-home point" from the Drabick et al. article on brief, in-class writing assignments. Suggest how Wade's critical thinking guidelines might be used in teaching.

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

(pp. 314-324): Designing effective writing assignments
(pp. 325-334): Evaluating students' written work
(pp. 349-354 only): Plagiarism

Drabick, D. A. G., Weisberg, R., Paul, L., & Bubier, J. L. (2007). Keeping it short and sweet: Brief, ungraded writing assignments facilitate learning. Teaching of Psychology, 34, 172-176.

Avoiding plagiarism . Clearly explains plagiarism, provides guidelines for avoiding it, and offers side-by-side examples of passages correctly and incorrectly written.

Wade, C. (1997). Critical thinking guidelines.

 

Feb 10 (section 001) or Feb 12 (section 002): Consultation (No group meeting; only individual appointments during this week)


Feb 17 (section 001) or Feb 19 (section 002): Consultation (No group meeting; only individual appointments during this week)


Feb 24 (section 001) or Feb 26 (section 002): Ethical issues in teaching

Assignment: By 8:00 am on the day of your group meeting, submit one question for discussion that is based on the readings.

Keith-Spiegel, P., Whitley, JR., B. E., Perkins, D. V., Balogh, D. W., & Wittig, A. F. (2001). Ethical dilemmas confronting graduate teaching assistants: Issues and cases. In L. R. Prieto & S. A. Meyers (Eds.), The teaching assistant training handbook: How to prepare TAs for their responsibilities (pp. 133-147 only). Stillwater, OK: New Forums Press.

Schwartz, H. L. (2009, September 28). Facebook: The new classroom commons? Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved October 14, 2009 from http://chronicle.com/article/Facebook-The-New-Classroom/48575/

Keith-Spiegel, P., Whitley, Jr., B. E., Balogh, D. W., Perkins, D. V., & Witting, A. F. (2002). Afterword: Prevention and peer intervention. In The ethics of teaching: A casebook (2nd ed., pp. 260-265). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.



Mar 3 (section 001) or Mar 5 (section 002):
No class


TBA:
Deadline for posting PY 101 midterm grades on myBama

Mar 10 (section 001) or Mar 12 (section 002): Assessment of teaching

Assignment: Be prepared to answer the following: (a) What aspects of your teaching can students and colleagues legitimately assess? (b) What general statement can be made about the validity of student ratings? What do you think is the biggest worry of instructors about student ratings? What does the evidence suggest? (c) Hundreds of studies have examined whether or not certain variables are related to student ratings. Do any of the findings surprise you? (d) What was noteworthy about the teaching philosophy statements that you read? What tips did you pick up on writing your own? (e) What is a presentation (i.e., teaching) portfolio? What elements do you think are important to include in a portfolio? (g) In your own words, what is a learner-centered college? What are some of the arguments for and against documenting student learning through learning outcomes and assessment?

Assignment: Be prepared to answer the following: You are on a search committee that is writing an ad for a new faculty position in your department. In addition to evidence of research productivity and promise, you want to assess applicants’ teaching effectiveness and potential. What will you ask them to submit?

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

(pp. 461-471): Early feedback to improve teaching and learning
(pp. 534-550): Student rating forms
(pp. 481-488): Teaching portfolios

Teaching philosophy statements. A few examples from the many excellent teachers who have come through the ToP course: Rachel Baden, Joe Chandler, Brad Okdie, Martha Combs.

Montell, G. (2003, March 27). How to write a statement of teaching philosophy. Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved November 17, 2003 from http://chronicle.com/jobs/2003/03/2003032702c.htm

Learning outcomes matrix template. Note: Here is a structure for creating a matrix.

Sample learning outcomes matrix. Note: Here is Philip Gable's example of an outcomes and assessment matrix.

Sample learning outcomes matrix. Note: Here is Steve Prentice-Dunn 's example of an outcomes and assessment matrix.

Gerow, J. R. (2009, December). Learning objectives for introductory psychology: May I object? E-xcellence in Teaching (Newsletter sponsored by the Society for the Teaching of Psychology).

 

Mar 17 (section 001) or Mar 19 (section 002): Spring holidays



Mar 24 (section 001) or Mar 26 (section 002): Trends in higher education

Assignment: Write a 1-2 page summary of your teaching philosophy. It should be single-spaced, with double spacing between paragraphs. Send it to me as an e-mail attachment by class time on the day of your weekly group meeting.

Assignment: Be ready to discuss: Why should you think about what to do on the final day of the semester? What is your reaction to the article, “Inside the flipped classroom”? What points stand out from the article, “Big data on campus”?

Davis, B. G. (2009). Tools for teaching (2nd ed.). San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.

(pp. 531-532 only): Providing closure

Final day activity for PY 101 . Note: Here is a possible exercise for the last day of class.

Mangan, K. (2013, September 30). Inside the flipped classroom. Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved November 7, 2013 from http://chronicle.com/article/Inside-the-Flipped-Classroom/141891/

Perry, M. (2012, July 18). Big data on campus. New York Times. Retrieved July 25, 2012 from http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/22/education/edlife/colleges-awakening-to-the-opportunities-of-data-mining.html?pagewanted=1&_r=1&hpw

Berrett, D, (2014, November 18). Now, everything has a learning outcome. Retrieved November 20, 2014 from http://chronicle.com/article/Now-Everything-Has-a-Learning/149897/

 

Mar 25: Last day to drop a course with a grade of W

 

Mar 25-Apr 6: Assignment: Consultation preparation

1. Record your class using the department's video camera.
2. Review your video. Optional: You may want to use the checklist on pp. 473-477 of the Davis textbook to guide your viewing.
3. Administer the 24-item evaluation form to your class. Take response sheets to Testing Services (205 Student Services) for scoring.
4. Pick up the summary printout from Testing Services.
5. Administer a narrative evaluation form to your class.
6. Review the numerical and narrative evaluations from your PY 101 class. For the 24-item form, there are three primary dimensions.
7. Send me (via e-mail attachment) a summary of the themes in the student evaluations and your reaction to the video.
8. Give the video and evaluations to me. If possible, email any handouts or PowerPoint slides used in class on the day of the video. Schedule consultation appointment.


Mar 31 (section 001) or Apr 2 (section 002): Transition from graduate student to new faculty member

Assignment: By 8:00 am on the day of your group meeting, submit one question for discussion that is based on the readings.

Vernon, L. L. (2004). It's a wonderful life. In W. Buskist, B. C. Beins, & V. W. Hevern (Eds.), Preparing the new psychology professoriate: Helping graduate students become competent teachers (pp. 152-156). Syracuse, NY: Society for the Teaching of Psychology. Retrieved May, 5, 2009 from http://www.teachpsych.org/resources/e-books/pnpp/

Ghodsee, K. (2008, April 25). A research career at a liberal-arts college. Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved May 24, 2008 from http://chronicle.com/cgi-bin/printable.cgi?article=http://chronicle.com/weekly/v54/i33/33c00101.htm

Prentice-Dunn, S. (in press). Seeking balance in one's early career: Teaching, research, service, and private life. In D. Dunn (Ed.), The Oxford handbook of undergraduate psychology education. London: Oxford University Press. Note: I will supply a copy of this chapter.

Cottingham, K. L. (2009). Questions to ask (or be prepared to answer) during an academic interview. Retrieved November 2, 2010 from http://www.dartmouth.edu/~gradstudy/careers/services/interview/acad.html Note: Just browse this list to get a sense of the various audiences and range of questions.

Perlmutter, D. D. (2013, April 1). The etiquette of accepting a job offer. Chronicle of Higher Education. Retrieved April 1, 2013 from http://chronicle.com/article/The-Etiquette-of-Accepting-a/138207/

Zakrajsek, T. (2007). Effective teaching when class size grows APS Observer, 16. Retrieved December 13, 2007 from http://www.psychologicalscience.org/observer/getArticle.cfm?id=2169


TBA: UA's SOI (Student Opinions of Instruction) online instructor/course evaluation becomes available on myBama. (Please inform your PY 101 students. In addition, please complete the form for PY 695.)


Apr 7 (section 001) or Apr 9 (section 002):
Consultation (No group meeting; only individual appointments during this week)


Apr 14 (section 001) or Apr 16 (section 002): Consultation
(No group meeting; only individual appointments during this week)

 

Apr 21 (section 001) or Apr 23 (section 002): Meet with next semester's instructors

Apr 29: Assignment: Submit an evaluation of the PY 695 course. (See guidelines)


May 5:
Deadline for posting PY 101 course grades on myBama